Hurricane Safety: What you Need to Know

Hurricanes: What you Need to Know

Hurricane Safety: What you Need to Know

Lately, it seems natural disasters are on the rise, and chances are at some point or another in our lives, we all will experience earthquakes, tornadoes, monsoons, cyclones, flooding, and, of course, hurricanes. These natural disasters can happen at home, or unfortunately, while we are away traveling the world. What’s important is that we are prepared for the situation.

Hurricane Safety

Aftermath from Irene in the Dominican Republic. Image from CNN.com.

Currently, the entire East Coast is bracing for Hurricane Irene ( you can use this Hurricane Tracker to see her progress). Just as I had mentioned in my post about earthquakes, What Do You Do When the Earth Shakes?, I grew up in a region of the United States that is rarely affected by natural disasters, including hurricanes. This means my knowledge of what to do when one occurs is a little spotty. For instance, my last recollection of a hurricane was Hurricane Floyd in 1999, and as a freshman in high school, I was excited for the storm, as schools were canceled due to a State of Emergency. Since I don’t live in an area with a high hurricane risk, I don’t instinctively know what to do when one is headed my way. That being said, I did a little research.

Hurricane Safety

Hurricane Irene. Image from Nasa.gov

According to National Geographic, Hurricane Irene is “Looking Bad: for the U.S.. Many towns are evacuating residents, along with tourists, and since the last two weeks of August are a popular time to head to the coast, a lot of vacations ending pre-maturely, or will be getting off to a late start.

However, frustrating this interruption of travel may be, it’s important to recognize the severity of a hurricane. First, if you are told to evacuate, listen to the authorities. You are better off safe than sorry. Second, make sure you have enough food and water, along with candles and flashlights in case you lose electricity. Third, stay indoors. For other information and travel advisories, see the following links below and stay safe!

Hurricane Safety and Preparation Tips:

FEMA: Are You Ready?

How to Prepare for a Hurricane

Hurricane Preparedness Tips: How To Prep For The Storm

Hurricane Safety Tips


Who to Follow on Twitter :

Twitter seems to be the fastest way to spread information these days, for example the most recent Twitterquake, but it isn’t always reliable. Here are some reliable people/organizations to keep you updated on the storm.

Dr. Fran Vogler

Hurricane Central

CNN Breaking News

FEMA

The American Red Cross

The Weather Channel

Also, find your local government official on Twitter, and follow him or her for the most up-to-date information in your area.

If you are traveling or were planning on it, here’s How are airlines responding to Hurricane Irene?.

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Comment (1)

  1. eileen

    Lots of helpful information! Thanks…

Post a comment